Thursday, April 19, 2018

Looks like home

The house has felt like home since the first night. But finally, this week, it's starting to look like home - from the outside.

Despite the fact that it's mid April, the temperatures have felt more like early March. There have been a few false starts to spring, and one day of full-on summer on Saturday, which is when I got most of the planters for the front patio potted up and in place. It's raining again today, and chilly, but I did two more pots and got them out front so they could get nicely watered in.

Things to do: get an outdoor faucet installed.  The lack of one might explain the ratty condition of the lawn, which won't be around much longer. At some point, I'm going to install a rain barrel, but right now I would like to actually be able to turn on a faucet and have water come out.

In old house news, it went on the market two weeks ago and I got several offers. I picked one, she had the house inspected and found no major monsters in the basement, so it looks like things are moving forward and soon I will only have one house on my plate. That will feel good.

Friday, April 6, 2018

End of an era

The house went up on the MLS yesterday, and the sign went up this morning.

It's still mine, but it no longer feels like mine.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Space

Bedroom. The floors never looked that good.
The emptying of the old house is somehow still going on.

My advice to you: declutter now, so you don't have to do it later.

I actually admitted defeat and hired my local thrift store to come in and empty the attic and basement. Whatever they couldn't use, they would take to the dump.

Living room. So much brighter without
curtains. Shame there are neighbors
4 feet away.
I assumed, wrongly, that all the contents of my house were of such high quality that they would dispose of very little.  And then I saw the dump receipt.

They removed a TON of stuff. Literally a ton.

I'm dizzy at the idea, even knowing that about 200 lbs. of it was my big wooden conference table that I used in the workroom.  (They said it had limited resale because of its ginormous size, and also they didn't have a place to store it).

Even then, I had to get a scrap metal guy to come in and remove the old dryer, 50 year old hot water heater, and an old oil tank.  The last 2 had been in the basement when I bought the house,but as my realtor just told me,"It's not 2000 anymore; standards are higher."

Which means, apparently, a clean basement. And attic. And floors. And rooms that no longer even faintly smell of cat.  I found a cleaning product at the dollar store that did everything. It's recommended for use in "public bathrooms and animal quarters," so I figured it would shine floors and alleviate minor cat funk in a few corners.

It certainly did that. The smell of the cleaning product was so strong it clung to my clothes, and the house smelled like a roofing truck drove into a bar.  The smell faded after a few days. Thankfully.

Kitchen.  It hurts to leave those
cabinets behind. But they're so
perfect in that space.
Every time we go back, I think we're done. And every time we leave, we say, "Just one more day should do it."

This time, I think we're right.


Workroom. The table took up
almost the entire space.
*** In case anyone wants to look up the cat-odor-defeating product, it's called Creolina.  Here's a link, but there's a good chance you can find it locally.  Try your nearest dollar store and work out from there. 

Friday, March 23, 2018

The Ikea Effect

The old house is almost empty.  The only things left are tools and cleaning supplies.  After this weekend, (hopefully) we can hand the house off to the realtor.

We stopped there after work yesterday and brought a carload of assorted items from the basement, attic and dark corners of my workroom.  We parked in the driveway, unloaded by the back door, and I unlocked the door.  Or attempted to.  It didn't work.  I checked; I had the right key.  I tried again.   .

Mario tried his key and it didn't work.  We both stood there for a second, staring at our suddenly-uncooperative door.  It reminded me of the time several winters ago when I turned on the kitchen faucet and nothing happened - your brain is just so used to faucet = water that it didn't compute when the water didn't happen.  (The pipes were frozen, but it took a few seconds for the realization to sink in).

This was like that.  Key + lock = entry to house, right?  Nope.

Mario let himself in by the front door and was able to open the kitchen door from the inside.  He was going to call a locksmith, but it wasn't a key/lock issue, it was apparently that the entire handleset was somehow wonky, and I didn't think that was worth paying someone else to tell us.  We looked up new, similar sets online and while they're expensive ($150ish), it's something that lasts for decades, so it's worth it.  We decided to let it go and just use the front door for now, until the old house sells and we have more cash on hand.

But.

After dinner, as he was settled in on the couch, talking back to MSNBC, I got my work light, some lock lubricant, a couple of screwdrivers and a pair of pliers, and went to work on the door. Oh, and a glass of wine.  Lubricant for me, as well as the lock. I got the old set off, took it apart, cleaned and reassembled it.  A few interior screws were loose, and while I can't fix the screw at the bottom of the handle (it's both stripped and corroded, so I can't even remove it), I was able to get the whole thing back together, on the door and functioning.

It's not perfect, but I'm optimistic that we can get another 6 months out of it. And if I was able to temporarily repair and reinstall this lock, I'll easily be able to install the new one.

They call it the Ikea effect, that rush you get from completing a task yourself (albeit sometimes imperfectly), rather than paying an expert to do it for you.  It feels good.

Or maybe that was the wine?

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Happy Spring

Our new town looks pretty in the snow, a little like Bedford Falls.  Frank Capra-esque charm aside, this is the third snowstorm in less than 3 weeks, and my second snow day in 2 weeks, and yesterday was the first day of spring.





Friday, March 16, 2018

Happy tears

 In the midst of packing to move, I was contacted by a woman who I'd met last summer at a craft show in South Philly.  We'd talked generally at the time about custom bears and she took a card, but that happens at nearly every show and people rarely follow up.

This woman did.

Her daughter is having a baby very soon, and she reached out because she wanted to make a "family bear" for her. 

Every piece of fabric in this bear came from a piece of cherished clothing from one family member or another. 

I met up with her at lunchtime from the office, heard the stories about each piece of clothing, each person, and took the bag home to start her bear.

Trying to get in "maker mode" when I was in the middle of packing wasn't easy, but once I started laying out my pattern pieces, this little guy came together.

A friend stopped by  as I was stringing him together, and she said, hoping not to offend, that my work was beautiful, she wasn't so sure about the bear.  I understood her meaning, but said that the bear would be beautiful to my customer, because of all the people it represented, and that the only part of the piece I could control was my work.

Bear's pieces: head and body - tweed jacket from customer's mom; denim jacket from her dad.  Floral silk on head - Dad's Liberty tie.  Navy on legs - dress my customer wore to her daughter's wedding.  Blue-and-whtie gingham - curtains my customer made for her daughter's childhood bedroom.  Ears - dad's hankie.  Foot pads - mom's leather glove.  Salmon jersey - dad's pullover.  Teal cotton (and embroidered portion) - blouse made by the mom-to-be.

The small blanket behind the bear in the second picture consists of pieces donated by the baby's father's family - a "no fear" hat, a gray cashmere sweater, a dark silk from a dress, and a wool hat from both parents' high school.  (With a little of that salmon jersey to tie it all together).

I think it's a little alarming, but in a good way, and my customer burst into tears in her building lobby, so I'm taking that as a good thing.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Cozy

Well, our move was delayed by a snowstorm, and here we are, just a few days later, getting hit with another one.

No matter, it just gives me more time to unpack. 

The kitchen is basically done, other than making new curtains. The previous owner left theirs behind in all the rooms on the first floor, and I appreciate not having to rush to make new ones. Even these apple print ones in the kitchen are pretty neutral.

You'll notice the kitchen is green, instead of orange.  That's because the main house color living room/dining room/hall - is a warm terracotta and I didn't want us overwhelmed with varying shades of orange.

I'm a little frustrated that I don't have room for all my art, but the limitations are good. I'm being forced to choose my favorite pieces.

Here's the kitchen so far.

The cabinets will get redone or replaced somewhere down the road, but now that I've painted the walls, I don't mind the color as much.  My least favorite part is the Formica backsplash, which started out as white with gold flecks but has yellowed over the decades. It's a small thing. I'll think of something to update it when we've dealt with the rest of the place.

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Rain Delay

I scheduled the movers to come this Friday, and we've been packing nonstop and driving a load over every evening.

The floor is coming along. The best thing I found to use on it was Dif wallpaper stripper,which has done a decent job of softening the crud.  I still need to scrape, but it's going faster.

One unexpected delay: my contractor, who had a nice to do list of ceiling fans, outlets, gas lines, etc., vanished. Or at least went incommunicado.  Being Facebook friends, I checked to see what was up, and found out that he'd fallen off the wagon after 17 years of sobriety.

I know it's far worse for him than for us, but I'd be lying if I said there wasn't an element of "Why us, why now?" in my mind.  I did actually attempt to replace him, but the new electrician and plumber both failed to show up, and he did.  So . . .

As of tonight, we've achieved 3 drywall ceilings upstairs, a new fan in the bedroom, a fan in the kitchen, some tweaks to the breaker box downstairs, and tomorrow he's finishing the lights in our workrooms, the hallway, the dining room, and if there's time, he'll run the gas line for the stove.

Maybe it's wrong, but I'm not mentioning the fact that our move has been put off until Sunday.  Friday it's supposed to be rainy, snowy, windy and unpleasant.  I've never moved in the rain yet and I'm happy to have the flexibility to be able to shift everything to a better day.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Progress

We made settlement on Monday, and arrived at the title company's offices with our car loaded up like the Beverly Hillbillies on their way to California.  As soon as the last papers were signed, we dropped our first load of stuff at the new house.

Although it's much smaller than our current house, it seems to be absorbing things well enough so far.

Saturday we rented a friend's son-in-law for the day so that Mario would have help removing the first floor carpet and pad.  They knocked that out really quickly and managed to get the drop ceiling out of the two rooms on the second floor before we had to return him.  I got the kitchen painted while they were doing all that.

The only thing slowing down progress right now is the remaining gunk on the living room and dining room hardwood floors.  The carpet was laid in 1968, and despite nearly 50 years of use, it was still in really good shape (though a totally different color than it was originally, which we only realized when the sofa came out).  The pad also seemed pretty springy, but when it was pulled out, it was obvious that 50 years of foot traffic and yearly rug shampooing had caused some of the foam pad to stick to the hardwood.

Other than that, the wood is in excellent condition, still with a nice shellac shine.  I just spent a good 4 hours yesterday squatting, kneeling and lying on the dining room floor with a pastry cutter, which turned out to be the best implement on hand to scrape with.  I tried wetting the dried foam with a solution of dish soap and water, and that helped a bit.  Someone else suggested vinegar and water, on the assumption that vinegar cuts almost anything.  Another person suggested wallpaper stripper as a non-toxic option that removes unpleasant dried-on substances.

I'm open to other suggestions, if anyone has one.  What would you use to soften dried-on, dried-out carpet padding stuck to shellacked floors?

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Tiny house

I have to remember, this didn't
always look like this. 
Have you ever going back to your childhood home, and realized it was much smaller than you remembered? How did you live in that tiny space? And why did it seem so much bigger in your memories?

Yesterday we did the final walk-through of the new house prior to going to settlement on Monday. The sellers did a fantastic job of emptying the house. The garage and basement are just empty spaces waiting for us to load them with our stuff. Likewise the other rooms, except for one small detail - they're small.

Honestly, the house isn't that small. It's just under 1200 square feet which is by no means a tiny house, but after 18 years of living in a three-story house with a walk-in attic and a full basement, this feels like something you can tow behind your car.

I think right now, surrounded as we are with boxes and all the furniture in wrong places and all the art off the walls, it seems like an enormous amount of stuff we're trying to cram into a small space. And I probably am being a bit unrealistic about how much will fit, but that's why thrift stores were invented. There's a very nice one just down Baltimore Avenue from the house, and I'm sure I will become even more familiar with them as things don't fit into the jigsaw puzzle I am building.

Soon, this won't look like this either.
I do know, however that once we are in, settled, and everything is put in its proper place, we are going to be very happy here. It's a much better size, it's a far more practical house, it's a lovely community, and it will be good to live in a place that we have chosen together.

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Book Sale, part 2

Round one of the book sale is over, though there are a few leftovers - some not purchased, some purchased by overseas buyers who (intelligently) canceled when we realized the price of shipping.  But there are still more, and here they all are. 

Photos and links are from Amazon, so you can read more about them and see current pricing.  Shipping will be via media mail, and I'll let you know the cost when you claim the book.  Payment via PayPal only, and for your sake, as well as mine, U.S. buyers only.

Contact me via email at karen6790 @ msn . com (without all the spaces) to let me know what books you want.

Pattern Drafting for Dressmaking, Pamela Stringer.  All line drawings.  Very thorough instructions.  Paperback, excellent condition. $20


Couture - The Art of Fine Sewing, Roberta Carr.  Published by Palmer/Pletsch.  Some of the illustrations are dated, but the tips and techniques are eternal.  Paperback.  Minor edge wear to cover.  $7.50


Famous Frocks, Sara Alm & Hannah McDevitt.  Includes 10 patterns.   Excellent condition.  Hardcover. $10.


The Bishop Method of Clothing Construction, Edna Bishop.  Revised edition.  Some edge wear, but good condition overall.  Fabulous resource; I have an extra copy of this that isn't leaving my shelves.  Paperback.  $5


Patternmaking for a Perfect Fit, Stefani Lincecum.  Subtitled "Using the Rub-off Technique to Recreate and Redesign your Favorite Fashions.  Excellent condition, paperback.  SOLD


Reader's Digest Complete Guide to Needlework.  Excellent reference, as good as their guide to sewing, which is what I use for classes.  Hardcover.  Very good condition.  Free with cost of shipping. SOLD


Patternmaking, Dennic Chunman Lo.  (Portfolio Skills - Fashion & Textile).  Brand new.  Looks like a very thorough, well-illustrated text.  Paperback.  $15.


Cool Couture, Kenneth D. King. Excellent condition, signed copy from PatternReview weekend 2010 in Philadelphia.  Paperback.  $7.50

Basics of Fashion Design: Construction, by Anette Fischer. Covers pattern drafting, draping and construction techniques.  Good photos and drawings.  $5

Fashion Designer's Directory of Shape & Style, Simon Travers-Spencer and Zarida Zaman.  Very useful resource, very good condition.  Paperback.  $5 


Classic Tailoring Techniques, a Construction Guide for Men's Wear, Roberto Cabrera.  Excellent tailoring reference, especially for all the interesting structural challenges involved in menswear.  Paperback, like new condition.  SOLD


Secrets of the Couturiers, Frances Kennett.  Very good condition.  Some of the fashions are dated, but others are vintage, and all the techniques and illustrations are solid.  Hardcover.  $5 


African Art in Needlework, Leslie Tillett.  Subtitled "Motifs inspired by African Culture," this book shows a lot of traditional garments/textiles, and then breaks down the motifs so that they can be reworked, not strictly replicated.  An unusual find.  Paperback, some edge wear.


Fine Machine Sewing, Carol Laflin Ahles.  Machine methids to get the look of hand finishing and embellishing.  Paperback.  $7

High Fashion Sewing Secrets from the world's best designers, Claire B. Shaeffer.  A step-by-step guide to sewing stylish seams, buttonholes, pockets, collars, hems & more.  Retired library book, a few stamps and a label on spine, but the book is sound, with only a bit of edge wear.  The styles may be a bit dated, but the information is great.  (It's Claire Shaeffer, after all).  Hardcover.  $7


The Complete Family Sewing Book.  Vintage 1972 ring-bound reference.  Fabulous illustrations, with the best of 1970s fashion.  Solid technical information.  $5


Art Deco Textiles - The French Designers, Alain-Rene Hardy.  A beautiful reference of 1920s-1930s French textiles.  Paperback.  SOLD


Patternmaking for Fashion Design, Helen Joseph Armstrong.  Classic textbook.  1987 edition, dated clothing but fantastic instruction.  Some writing in book, but does not obscure the information.  Definite wear on spine and edges.  Hardcover. SOLD


BiblioCraft: Using Library Resources to Jumpstart Creative Projects, Jessica Pigza.  Excellent condition.  Gorgeous, inspirational book.  It's done its work here, time for it to move along.  Hardcover.  $7


Please, for the love of all the sewing gods, take some of these off my hands.  Email me directly with your shopping list, I'll mark books off as they sell.  


Friday, February 2, 2018

New old machine

Say hello to my little friend.

I bought this machine over 10 years ago. She worked beautifully, and then one day she didn't. The zeros on the digital display just kept blinking and circling, and wouldn't let me select a stitch. I took it to my repairman, who mostly works on mechanicals. He was stumped and handed it over to a friend, who dealt mostly with electronic machines. Neither of them had a clue what was wrong. I decided to put it away until I had the time and money to take it to a Juki repair shop.

Fast forward. Now that I'm packing, I pulled the machine out to give it a last once-over before giving it away. I turned it on, the same thing happened with the display, and after I had pushed all of the obvious buttons and turned all of the obvious switches, I happened to notice that the bobbin winder knob was pushed in. I moved it out, and voila! A functioning machine, which defeated two repair men, and has been sitting in a box under a table for 10 years.

Mario totally didn't understand the level of swearing this provoked.

Also, I never wind bobbins on my machine, so it getting moved at all was an accident.

All of us were looking for a complicated problem, and when you do that, you don't see the stupid staring you right in the face.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Not according to plan

There have been some changes in my plans for the new house. The downstairs consists of the living room, a dining room through a large archway and the kitchen. And that was my original plan for those three rooms.

Then, a few weeks ago, I was at a friend's house and I noticed that her dining room did not have a dining room table. Instead it had a couch, a desk, and all her bookcases. And on my walk home, I thought, why not?

In our current living room we have seven bookcases, all full, and my desk. I really don't want those things in the new living room, because it'll make it feel too crowded, and also because I want my desk out of direct earshot of the television. It's hard to write or do anything when the news is constantly shouting in the background.

And I know better then to try to turn down the news.

Table top?
So, a book room. An office. A library, a den, a sitting room, a parlor, a salon. One of those things, we haven't yet decided what it's going to be called. But the next thing I will be putting up on the Facebook internet yard sale will be my dining room table.

The new house is smaller, and we need to use the space wisely. Having a separate room where the books can live and where I can flop on a love seat and read while Mario watches TV in the other room is a far better use for the space than keeping it as a showcase for some nice furniture and a place to eat twice a year. At first I was a little iffy, but now I'm actually quite excited about it.

The problem: what to do with all the art currently on the dining room walls. It's a big room, with high ceilings, and even if the new room wasn't mostly being filled with bookcases, there wouldn't be enough wall space for all this. So some of it stays, some of it goes, and for one large piece, I have an idea.

The room in question
Is it totally weird that I want to put legs on this piece and turn it into a coffee table in front of my new love seat? It would take up too much wall space but I think it would actually make a really cool table. The glass is thick enough that using it as a table top, and maybe putting the occasional sock feet on it, won't break anything.

I'm going to give it a shot.  I might even have something around the house, in the attic or the basement, with legs that could be frankensteined onto it. Stay tuned

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Kitchen capers

I've always been a nester. A decorator.  Someone who likes to fiddle and fuss with her home until it's perfect. Except my perfect isn't perfect, it's comfortable

I like old things, pieces that have some history and life to them.  And I like color.  Lots of it.  And prints.  Nothing will make me crazy faster than white walls.

The new house has all white walls.

But these aren't bad; it feels like the previous owners, an older couple, left me a lovely blank slate to start with. 

Take the kitchen.  It's dated. It's probably the tiredest room in the house, but I like it.  The layout is very comfortable for the way I cook. It's big enough for a table and chairs and two of my vintage freestanding cabinets, and the existing kitchen cabinets are all in really good shape.  They're just dark, and make it feel gloomy.

Enter paint, my favorite thing.  Cabinets will be lightly sanded, and painted cream to match my vintage ones. New hardware.  Walls are going to be a warm squash/orange color called "guppy."  I'll reuse my current curtains and some of the art, and I think with very little money or effort, this will become a bright, cheery room where I will love to spend time.

My current kitchen, much as I adore it, looks out onto the alley and gets no direct sunlight.  These photos were taken on New Years Eve in the afternoon and are still bright.

Oh, and that light fixture?  Its days are numbered.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Third time's the charm

After the house fell through, there was another one we liked.

Turns out they got an offer on that one while we were walking through.

This is house #3. Actually, it's about house #12, but the third serious option.

It's just big enough. 1200 square feet.  Roughly half the size of our current living space.

What color wine goes with panic?

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Book sale

So, packing. Packing sucks.

Books are easy to pack, but heavy, and I have far too many of them.  I'm culling the sewing shelves first, and what appears here are either duplicates, unused for far too long, or not likely to be used and I'd rather they found a new home.

All books priced are priced to sell.  Photos and links are from Amazon, so you can read more about them and see current pricing.  Shipping will be via media mail, and I'll let you know the cost when you claim the book.  Discounts will be given for multiple book purchases.  Payment via PayPal only.

Contact me via email at karen6790 @ msn . com (without all the spaces) to let me know what books you want.

Famous Frocks, Sara Alm & Hannah McDevitt.  Includes 10 patterns.   Excellent condition.  Hardcover. $10.


Making Trousers for Men & Women, David Page Coffin.  Includes CD.  Excellent condition.  Paperback.  $7.50 SOLD

The Bishop Method of Clothing Construction, Edna Bishop.  Revised edition.  Some edge wear, but good condition overall.  Fabulous resource; I have an extra copy of this that isn't leaving my shelves.  Paperback.  $5


Cool Couture, Kenneth D. King. Excellent condition, signed copy from PatternReview weekend 2010 in Philadelphia.  Paperback.  $7.50

Designer Bead Embroidery, Kenneth King.  150 Patterns and complete techniques.  Excellent condition and gorgeous resource, but my embroidery doesn't tend toward the beaded and it should find its person.  Paperback.  $10

Pattern Magic, Tomoko Nakamichi.  English version.  Excellent condition.  I've stared at this book until my eyes crossed, but I know I'm never going to make any of these garments.  Paperback.  $10 SOLD


Fashion Designer's Directory of Shape & Style, Simon Travers-Spencer and Zarida Zaman.  Very useful resource, very good condition.  Paperback.  $5 SOLD


Fashion Design Drawing Course, Caroline Tatham & Julian Seaman.  "Principles, practice & Techniques, an ultimate guide for the aspiring fashion artist.  Retired library book with stamp in back cover and sticker on spine.  Very good condition.  Paperback.  This one is a freebie-with-purchase (and shipping), or for cost-of-shipping only.  SOLD


Bridal Couture, Susan Khalje, intro by Claire Shaeffer.  Fine sewing techniques for wedding gowns and evening wear.  Slight edge wear, but very good condition otherwise.  Hard to find.  Paperback.  $20 SOLD


Secrets of the Couturiers, Frances Kennett.  Very good condition.  Some of the fashions are dated, but others are vintage, and all the techniques and illustrations are solid.  Hardcover.  $5 


Fine Machine Sewing, Carol Laflin Ahles.  Machine methids to get the look of hand finishing and embellishing.  Paperback.  $7

High Fashion Sewing Secrets from the world's best designers, Claire B. Shaeffer.  A step-by-step guide to sewing stylish seams, buttonholes, pockets, collars, hems & more.  Retired library book, a few stamps and a label on spine, but the book is sound, with only a bit of edge wear.  The styles may be a bit dated, but the information is great.  (It's Claire Shaeffer, after all).  Hardcover.  $7


Art Deco Textiles - The French Designers, Alain-Rene Hardy.  A beautiful reference of 1920s-1930s French textiles.  Paperback.c  $5

Patternmaking for Fashion Design, Helen Joseph Armstrong.  Classic textbook.  1987 edition, dated clothing but fantastic instruction.  Some writing in book, but does not obscure the information.  Definite wear on spine and edges.  Hardcover. $10


In Vogue - 60 years of celebrities and fashion from British Vogue, Georgina Howell.  Significant edge and spine wear - I've had this since the 1980s - but the pages are still clean and tightly bound, and it shows just about every person and outfit worth seeing that ever appeared in Vogue.  Oversized paperback.  This is another freebie-with-purchase (and shipping) or free with cost-of-shipping.   


Fashion Illustration - Figure Drawing.  Another good fashion illustration reference.  Another freebie-with-purchase (and shipping) or free with cost-of-shipping.  Hardcover.


The Dressmaker's Dictionary, Ann Ladbury.  Ex-library book, a few stamps and clear protective cover.  Good vintage general reference book.  Hardcover.  $3 SOLD


Singer Sewing Book, Mary Brooks Picken. 1954 edition.  (Amazon listing is for the 1949 edition, this has a slightly different cover).  Ex-library book, clear plastic protective cover.  Contains lots of vintage fashion illustrations, along with technical drawings and home dec instruction.  Hardcover.  $5 SOLD


The Complete Illustrated Stitch Encyclopedia, Crafter's Choice.  No dust jacket, but book in excellent condition.  A great reference, but a very common and inexpensive one, so another freebie-with-purchase or for cost-of-shipping only.


BiblioCraft: Using Library Resources to Jumpstart Creative Projects, Jessica Pigza.  Excellent condition.  Gorgeous, inspirational book.  It's done its work here, time for it to move along.  Hardcover.  $7


The Complete Book of Sewing:  Dressmaking and Sewing for the Home Made Easy, Constance Talbot.  Vintage 1943 first edition, great wartime fashion illustrations.  Minor wear to the spine and a little to the bottom corners.  Hardcover.  $15 SOLD


The Art of Sewing - Traditional Favorites, Time-Life Books.  1974 book with fabulous 1970s fashion illustrations.  Chapters include: A Brilliant Renaissance, A Legacy of Sewing Techniques, Fabrics by Patchwork, and Traditional Needlecrafts.  Lots of photos and technical illustrations.  Hardcover, with split to the spine but no loose pages.  This is a freebie-with-purchase or cost-of-shipping book.


Please, for the love of all the sewing gods, take some of these off my hands.  Email me directly with your shopping list, I'll mark books off as they sell.