Saturday, April 24, 2010

BWOF 2/2009 #124

Air silence for a week, and then two posts in one day! No, I haven't been taken over by aliens, I'm just too tired to sleep and the birthday boy is unconscious on the couch not watching Dr. Who reruns. When I'm done here, I'll give him a poke and watch him sleepwalk down the hall.

But due to tiredness and having already said most of what I need to about this dress, here in all its eloquence is the patternreview:

Pattern Description: It's the packaging that counts! This bold floral print will drive out those winter blues - guaranteed! Our sheath dress is slightly fitted, falling straight to the hem, and is fastened at the back with an invisible zip.

In one description, Burda calls it a shift, then they call it a sheath. I guess it depends on how much fit you're going for. I went for sheath.

Pattern Sizing: BWOF sizes 38 to 46. I made a size 40, a bit larger than my usual 38, but I think I ended up somewhere between the two sizes. Here's a back view of it on me, slightly wrinkled from sitting for a few hours.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Absolutely, except of course the flowered version of the dress has almost no visbile details, and the lace version of the dress isn't much better. Neither version shows the very cute V back of the dress, which is a shame because I think it's one of the best points.

Were the instructions easy to follow? For Burda, they seemed really good - though there are so few pieces to this dress, they're basically unnecessary. Burda should have saved the clarity for one of those 3 dot patterns that have us smacking ourselves on the forehead.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? I love patterns with simple style lines. (Actually I love fussy, complicated patterns more, but they don't go with my abiding love for prints, so I've grown to love simpler designs so that I can be as garish as I like). I loved the neckline in the front and when I saw the V back, I was sold.

The front bust darts line right up with the long fitting darts in the front of the skirt, which makes this dress a dream to fit. The back has darts in the skirt only, but that's because the back neck tapers down to a point not far above the empire seam. I have to say that the shaped facing for the back made for the neatest invisible zip insertion I've ever done.

Fabric Used: A very large print stretch woven I got at Metro Textiles at least a year ago, possibly longer. I thought it wanted to be a skirt, but apparently it wanted to be a dress. Or possibly a sofa, but the dress won out. I really was afraid of looking like grandma's favorite chair in this; I think certain patterns would have enhanced the home dec-ishness of the print, but this was simple enough to work with it, and the stretch allowed me to make the dress snug enough to make a statement while still being able to breathe, sit and eat dinner. You know, the important stuff.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made: Other than tweaking the seam allowances to get the fit I wanted, not a one. It's a simple pattern - front & back, top & bottom. Fitting darts in the front bodice and both sides of the skirt. The sleeves are cut on and look much less so than they do in the drawing. I would like to try this again and alter the pattern to include a regular sleeve, or possibly use a similar pattern with a good sleeve and incorporate the neckline elements that I liked here.

I made this dress up starting last weekend to wear to Mario's birthday dinner tonight. The fabric's been resting on the shelf for a while, but when I started looking for something to use with this pattern, it almost fell into my lap. Thinking about it, I think I subconsciously was looking for a fabric to wear with a favorite pair of shoes that don't leave the closet often enough.

But that's a good enough reason to make a dress, right?

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? Yes, and yes. I'm definitely going to try this again, and as I said, possibly work the pattern to include a sleeve, mainly so that I can wear a jacket over it. The sleeve - as is - is a bit wide to get into a jacket.

Conclusion: Yet another great sheath dress from Burda - they really should stick to sheaths, pencil skirts and trenches, that seems to be what they do best.

17 comments:

Sheila said...

Beautiful dress and love using simple patterns for bold prints. The shoes are perfect for the dress.

arnysews said...

Cute dress and seriously cute shoes. You definitely need to be making more companions for those shoes to step out with.

Vicki said...

Lovely! And it is perfectly acceptable, even desirable to buy shoes and then make an outfit to match :)

Maricou said...

this turned out great.
The shoes are very nice too

wendy said...

Wow, it's gorgeous :-) That print looks wonderful & it fits really well. I love the shoes- such a cute color.

Shannon said...

Most definitely not a sofa! :)

This dress is perfect on you.

eword10 said...

Gorgeous and Va Va Voom! I love it on you. Was Mario pleased? Did he wear his vest?

Linda said...

I really like this dress on you. Very flattering! Great use of fantastic looking fabric.

Nancy K said...

Love it on you. I also love the shoes. Perfect.

Sherril said...

It may not show the seam details, but that dress shows off your fabulous figure. I agree, those shoes are just the right touch and are perfect with the dress.

KID, MD said...

I love this dress. The shoes are uber fab.

meli88a said...

The fabric is a great match for this dress, which fits you perfectly!

Michelle said...

Beautiful dress! A perfect compliment for the fabric. Wonderful work!

gaylen said...

Absolutely love the dress! Your shoes look like saltwater sandals for a grownup - and I love that! g

Sewing Geek said...

I love, love, love the dress! It looks terrific!

Little Hunting Creek said...

What a pretty dress! It looks so fresh and perfect for spring and summer.

The Slapdash Sewist said...

So flattering! And the shoes are happy they have a companion now.